Run Tourism – Holland

Earlier in the year I ventured into the world of run tourism for the first time on a trip to Spain, I made sure to ask my wife if she minded me taking my kit and I was given the green light so off I went exploring around Albir, Althea and Benidorm.

IMG_20170818_151111Last week we went to the Duinrell holiday park in Wassenaar, Holland, when I say “we”, this wasn’t your average family holiday, this was 10 adults and 14 kids aged 3-13. I didn’t need to ask if I could take my kit this time, being in the middle of full on marathon training at the moment Catherine knew it was coming and that I’d be disappearing a couple of times to explore and get some miles in my legs.

Before travelling I put out a request on Twitter for any recommendations and the very kind Heart Runner Girl suggested a couple of possible runs for me based on her local knowledge. I managed three runs while I was there, all on different routes and all had their own particular features.

After the overnight ferry from Hull to Rotterdam we arrived at Duinrell on the Saturday, the first day was spent acclimatising and finding our way around the park and what it had to offer. I was already itching to get out though and so first thing on Sunday morning I was up and heading for the beach. It was a beautiful morning and after running down a few tree lined avenues the road turned slightly and the dunes that dominate this area of coastline began.

What I immediately noticed too was how everyone appeared to be catered for. There was the road, then a separate cycle path, a separate pavement and also a sand covered bridleway. Part way down to the beach the route forked and the road went off to the right whilst the other paths veered off left. I’m always cautious crossing roads abroad so the knowledge that I was on my own path helped me to relax and enjoy my run. After around 5k the path and road converged again at the main beach car park and then I followed the short path down to the beach itself, having taken a few photos I made the return trip and arrived back just as the rest of the family were waking up. It was a very straight forward run and clearly a popular one as I passed over 20 other runners in the 45 minutes of so that I was out. Without fail, everyone acknowledged me with a nod, a smile, a wave or said good morning (at least that’s what I think they were saying, my Dutch isn’t that great!). The knowledge gained during the run came in handy the next day when we decided on a trip to the beach. There was no way I was going to try and walk down to the beach with the kids given the distance but I knew we could park easily and having seen the bars and snack outlets I also knew that we’d be well catered for.

My second run was very much in the “make it up as you go along” category. This time I headed away from the beach and into the centre of Wassenaar, I came across a beautiful old windmill as I wended my way through the streets and then I discovered the various dykes and waterways that criss-crossed the town so I decided to follow them for a while and see where I ended up. The run was so tranquil, despite it being late afternoon and it was great to take in something so quintessentially Dutch. I did end up at a dyke that I couldn’t cross and so had to do a U-turn but that’s part of the adventure of exploring in this way. Eventually I ended up back at Duinrell after just over 10k and in time to fire up the BBQ for some well earned burgers, bratwurst and beer.

The third and final run was another early morning start this time in the direction of Den Haag. I followed the cycle path signs which indicated 10k to the city which is the official seat of Dutch government, home to the Netherlands’ monarch, parliament, ​and supreme court. The cycle path and pavement are away from the main roads and there were some gorgeous views of mist lingering across the fields as the sun came up. The cycle path signs made this a very easy route to follow and nearing the outskirts of Den Haag the signs changed to point you in the direction of various local landmarks. I decided to follow signs for the World Forum and this route took my through a beautiful park. I’d deliberately not checked my Garmin during my run but I felt like I maintained a decent pace assisted in no small part by the flat landscape which was in stark contrast to many of my normal routes. Just after 11 miles I checked my time and it looked like I could be on for an unofficial half marathon PB if I kept the pace up (I say unofficial as to me official PBs are set during races, I know people have different opinions on this but that’s my view). I felt good at this point and so I worked hard to keep going. My total distance for the run was 14.1 miles but when I saved the run I got that lovely “new record” message saying my new half marathon best time was 1:42.13, my official best time set at the Leeds Half Marathon earlier in the year is 1:44.55, let’s just say the two landscapes are rather different and I’m hoping that the flat lands around York can bring me an equally speedy time in a couple of weeks on my marathon debut.

All in all this was another great run tourism experience, I loved finding my way around a new place and taking in some of the local sights, next time you are away somewhere new why not take your kit and give it a try, don’t forget to put your feet up too though!

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Sitting Down Is Dangerous!

In one way, shape or form, we all do it, regardless of our personal circumstances our days tend to follow a pattern, the daily grind, the same old same old, or as the French wonderfully put it métro, boulot, dodo.

I recently wrote about breaking that cycle in terms of training and mixing it up and I’m doing my best to stick to my guns and heed my own advice. This week I’m planning on going out for a run at around 10pm, I have the ulterior motive of testing my new Unilite head torch, and I’m also going to attempt the Strava mile PB challenge, something I’m really looking forward to testing myself on.

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Since returning from holiday last week though I have noticed something that concerns me about my day to day. Since February I’ve had a niggling pain at the top of my right hamstring. It coincided with an increase in miles in my training and naturally I put it down to that. It’s never been majorly painful and hasn’t stopped me from running. I bought myself a foam roller to work on it and that provided a degree of relief. The niggle was still there though and ahead of the Leeds half marathon I went for my first ever sports massage to try and work it out, what an experience that was! I encountered uncharted levels of pain and paid £30 for the privilege, it seemed to do the trick and I got round pain free.

A couple of days later though the niggle was back and it stayed until I went on holiday. For the first two days I didn’t really give it a second thought but at the end of the second day after I’d done a 5 mile run it dawned on me that the niggle wasn’t there, it wasn’t there the day after or on any day whilst we were away despite me doing a further four runs in 26 degree heat.

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Last Tuesday I returned to work and that evening the niggle was back, I hadn’t even been out for a run. It’s there now having been sat at my desk all day and therein I think lies the problem. Whilst on holiday I was either relaxing on a sun lounger, in the pool or out running, the only time I sat down was to eat or drink cocktails! At work though I generally sit at my desk for over 7 hours a day and whilst I make a conscious effort to take breaks and go out for a leg stretch at lunchtime my job is what it is. Don’t get me wrong my employer does a lot of positive work around staff wellbeing, I’ve done my workstation assessment and I am in no way blaming this niggle on them. I think the issue is down to my posture, the way I shift around on my chair and the way that I actually rest my feet, sometimes I catch myself with my foot resting on its side and that can’t be good!

Sitting at a desk does seem a rather odd way to pick up an injury but our general posture is probably at the root of more problems than people are actually aware of and don’t forget dear readers that the former England footballer Rio Ferdinand once injured himself by straining a tendon in his knee from having his feet up on a coffee table for a couple of hours whilst watching TV, it happens to the best of us!

Be careful out there, injury is lurking everywhere in your everyday.